Understanding prequalification vs. pre-approval

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Usually, some type of pre-qualification is done in the first interview with a lender. Here you will provide basic information needed to help you obtain a loan.

The lender makes preliminary calculations based on information you give about your income, debts, and assets. These calculations help determine whether you can afford the loan you would like or how much you can afford to borrow. The lender may also explain the application process and steps to getting a mortgage at that company.

Prequalification occurs before the formal application is signed and submitted. At this time, lenders do not verify the information you give them, and they may not check your credit. Lenders are not committed to make a loan for you at this time. Prequalification is just an estimate of the amount you may qualify to borrow. You can use this preliminary information to assess the impact a particular monthly payment may have on your total budget.

In a pre-approval, lenders do check the accuracy of the information provided. They may contact the employer to verify employment dates and income and check your credit. If the information checks out and your credit is good, the lender will give you a pre-approval letter for a specific loan amount. You can be pre-approved by more than one lender. At this point, you are on the way to buying a home.

The pre-approval letter shows the real estate professional and home sellers that you are serious about buying a home, that your credit is good, and that you are working with a lender or lenders who will provide you with a loan. The pre-approval is specific to each lender but can be helpful in shopping with other lenders. Source: homeloanlearningcenter.com

Your Loan in the Valley

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Posted on February 23, 2015, in CUSTOMERS, NEWS, QUICK TIPS and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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