Monthly Archives: July 2015

5 Traits of Highly Successful Salesmen

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Selling and buying are not purely intellectual exercises. Buyers and sellers are emotional human beings, which is why great sales people are always masters at managing their own emotions and cultivating the following five emotional traits:

  1. Assertiveness

This allows you to move a sales situation forward without offending or frustrating the customer. Think of it as being located halfway between passivity and aggressiveness. For example, suppose a customer is delaying a decision. There are at least three basic responses:

Passive: “Could you give me a call when you’ve made a decision?”

Aggressive: “If you don’t buy right now, the offer is off the table.”

Assertive: “Can you give me a specific time and date when you’ll make your final decision?”

The passive response puts the sale on hold indefinitely (or give your competitor the opening to outsell you). The aggressive response creates pressure and resentment: Even if it works, you’ll be seen as a typical pushy salesman. The assertive approach sets up the specific conditions for the close, without forcing the customer’s pace.

  1. Self-Awareness

You need to be able to identify your own emotions, understand how they work, and then use them to help you build stronger customer relationships. This is a four-step process:

Identify the emotions that you’re feeling,

Based on experience, predict how those emotions will affect your sales effort.

Compensate for negative emotions that might hinder the sale.

Expand your positive emotions that might help you make the sale.

For example, suppose you feel furious that an important customer stood you up. You might take a break before your next meeting in order to remind yourself of all the times you’ve succeeded in the face of challenges. Or you might, as an ice-breaker, tell your second customer that you’re having a tough day and why.

  1. Empathy

This entails adapting your behavior to the customer’s moods and emotions. It begins with listening and observing, but simply knowing what the customer might be feeling is not enough. You must be able to feel what the customer is likely to be feeling.

Suppose, during a sales call, you discover that the customer’s firm just announced major layoffs. You could ignore the news and proceed with the sales call as if nothing had changed, or you could focus on your own desire to make the sale and ask your contact who will have buying authority after the layoffs are over.

Both responses to the event make business sense–but if you want to build a better relationship, you’ll be empathetic and imagine your contact’s sense of fear and confusion. Then, depending on your emotional reading of the customer, decide whether the customer would prefer to commiserate, complain or (alternatively) be distracted from the situation.

  1. Problem Solving

The desire to solve a problem helps you create new ways to satisfy the customer’s needs, both financial (the ROI of your offering) and emotional–such as the customer’s need to be convinced that your and your firm are reputable and reliable. Problem solving is a four step process:

See the customer situation as it really is. (Never try to solve a problem before you fully understand it.)

Help the customer visualize a more desirable situation.

Devise a way to move the customer from the ways things are today to the way the customer would like them to be.

Communicate that solution in a way that makes it easy for the customer to make a decision.

While those steps might seem obvious, they’re the exact opposite of old-school salesmanship, where selling entails “giving a great sales pitch.”

  1. Optimism

Optimism helps you maintain a sense of balance when things go awry. It proceeds directly from the (often unspoken) rules that you use to interpret daily events. For example, if the first sales call of the day goes poorly, your performance for the rest of the day will be different if you have this rule…

A bad first call means that I’m off my game this will be a bad day.

… rather than this rule:

Every sales call is different, so the next will probably be better.

Note that both rules are arbitrary responses to the same event, and neither is more “realistic” than the other. Even so, if you automatically jump to the first rule, rather than the second, it will be difficult for you to remain happy.

Source: inc.com by Geoffrey James

Do You Have What it Takes?

WhatittakesYLV-650In order to obtain a VA home loan, you must first fill out VA Form 26-1880, the request for your Certificate of Eligibility. This certificate is issued only through the Veterans Administration, and is the first step towards applying for your loan. Veterans, active duty, guard or reserve, and military spouses potentially qualify for this certificate. Keep in mind that the Certificate of Eligibility, while necessary, only allows an eligible individual to apply for a home loan; it does not guarantee a loan approval.

Eligibility for the Certificate is based on an individual’s (or a spouse’s) military service. Congress establishes eligibility with strict guidelines. Here are five common categories of those who normally qualify for a Certificate of Eligibility:

Wartime – Service During:

  • WWII: 9/16/1940 to 7/25/1947
  • Korean: 6/27/1950 to 1/31/1955
  • Vietnam: 8/5/1964 to 5/7/1975

You must have at least 90 days on active duty and been discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. If you served less than 90 days, you may be eligible if discharged for a service-connected disability.

Peacetime – Service during periods:

  • 7/26/1947 to 6/26/1950
  • 2/1/1955 to 8/4/1964
  • 5/8/1975 to 9/7/1980 (Enlisted)
  • 5/8/1975 to 10/16/1981 (Officer)

You must have served at least 181 days of continuous active duty and been discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. If you served less than 181 days, you may be eligible if discharged for a service connected disability.

Service after 9/7/1980 (enlisted) or 10/16/1981 (officer)

If you were separated from service which began after these dates, you must have:

  • Completed 24 months of continuous active duty or the full period (at least 181 days) for which you were ordered or called to active duty and been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable, or
  • Completed at least 181 days of active duty and been discharged under the specific authority of 10 USC 1173 (Hardship), or 10 USC 1171 (Early Out), or have been determined to have a compensable service-connected disability;
  • Been discharged with less than 181 days of service for a service-connected disability. Individuals may also be eligible if they were released from active duty due to an involuntary reduction in force, certain medical conditions, or, in some instances for the convenience of the Government.

Gulf War – Service during period 8/2/1990 to date yet to be determined

If you served on active duty during the Gulf War, you must have:

  • Completed 24 months of continuous active duty or the full period (at least 90 days) for which you were called or ordered to active duty, and been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable, or
  • Completed at least 90 days of active duty and been discharged under the specific authority of 10 USC 1173 (Hardship), or 10 USC 1173 (Early Out), or have been determined to have a compensable service-connected disability, or
  • Been discharged with less than 90 days of service for a service-connected disability. Individuals may also be eligible if they were released from active duty due to an involuntary reduction in force, certain medical conditions, or, in some instances, for the convenience of the Government.

Active Duty Service Personnel

If you are now on regular duty (not active duty for training), you are eligible after having served 181 days (90 days during the Gulf War) unless discharged or separated from a previous qualifying period of active duty service.

Selected Reserves or National Guard

If you are not otherwise eligible and you have completed a total of 6 years in the Selected Reserves or National Guard (member of an active unit, attended required weekend drills and 2-week active duty for training) and

  • Were discharged with an honorable discharge, or
  • Were placed on the retired list, or
  • Were transferred to the Standby Reserve or an element of the Ready Reserve other than the Selected Reserve after service characterized as honorable service, or
  • Continue to serve in the Selected Reserves

Individuals who completed less than 6 years may be eligible if discharged for a service-connected disability.

You may also be determined eligible if you:

  • Are an unremarried spouse of a veteran who died while in service or from a service connected disability, or
  • Are a spouse of a serviceperson missing in action or a prisoner of war

Note: Also, a surviving spouse who remarries on or after attaining age 57, and on or after December 16, 2003, may be eligible for the home loan benefit. However, a surviving spouse who remarried before December 16, 2003, and on or after attaining age 57, must apply no later than December 15, 2004, to establish home loan eligibility. VA must deny applications from surviving spouses who remarried before December 6, 2003 that are received after December 15, 2004.

Eligibility may also be established for:

  • Certain United States citizens who served in the armed forces of a government allied with the United States in WW II.
  • Individuals with service as members in certain organizations, such as Public Health Service officers, cadets at the United States Military, Air Force, or Coast Guard Academy, midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy, officers of National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, merchant seaman with WW II service, and others. Source: military.com

Has tenido alguna vez problemas con un cliente?

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Así como el Agentes se prepara para la negociación los clientes también lo hacen y en estos casos se debe tener especial cuidado con las estrategias que buscan presionar confundir, intimidar y debilitar al Realtor.

Estrategias más comunes y generales.

  1. Desgastar al Agente de Real Estate. El cliente no cede su postura inicial, cita al vendedor a horas que va desplazando a lo largo del día, no le da mucho tiempo a las reuniones, no cierra la negociación hasta que el vendedor termine cediendo a sus requerimientos, busca resultados por desgaste. Esta táctica es utilizada por clientes que tienen poder de negociación frente el vendedor.

  1. Buscan Confundir al  Agente de Real Estate. El cliente intencionalmente ataca y entrega argumentos que buscan confundir la negociación. Entrega información confusa, refutando acuerdos anteriores, cambia reglas de la negociación. En general, presiona buscando la confusión del vendedor, de una atmósfera incómoda para la negociación y así permite sacar ventaja en los resultados finales.

  1. Acortan los Plazos. Los clientes, en muchas ocasiones, presionan al vendedor para tomar la decisión pronto, sin mucha reflexión, manifiestan que no pueden esperar más días, utilizan expresiones como “lo tomas o lo dejas”, “hay más empresas interesadas en aceptar estos términos”, etc. y, de esta forma, dan ultimátum.

  1. Aumentan sus exigencias. A lo largo de la negociación van agregando nuevos elementos a su favor con lo cual van presionando al vendedor para que cierre la negociación.

  1. Mencionan a la competencia. Cada vez que hay que definir algún punto, el cliente manifiesta lo que la competencia está ofreciendo en la materia que se está tratando. Sin embargo, esta información puede diferir de la realidad lo cual lleva a que el vendedor termine entregando más servicios en relación a los de la competencia.

  1. Negocian en su oficina. El cliente invita a su terreno a negociar, es decir, juega a local. En este caso maneja los aspectos como la iluminación y ventilación del lugar; el inicio de la reunión (incluso dilatándolo), sientan al vendedor negociador a una menor altura, contestan el teléfono durante la negociación, etc. En general, dominan la mayoría de las variables y causan un efecto de tipo emocional sobre el vendedor. Source: infoservi.com

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